many


many
many, several, sundry, various, divers, numerous, multifarious mean consisting of a large number or comprising a large group.
Many implies a likeness between the individuals or units in class, category, kind, or sort; except that it vaguely implies more than a few, the term gives no explicit suggestion as to how large the number is
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of the eleven poets who accepted (representing, in many cases, a second choice on the part of the committee . . .)— Mary McCarthy

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many inventions which we now see to be precursors of the second industrial revolution— Wiener

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Several (see also DISTINCT 1) is almost as vague as many in its implication of number. In law the term is construed as meaning more than one; thus, the several counts of an indictment may be two or more counts. In more general use it is usually construed as meaning at least three
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the journey will take several days

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they saw several strangers on the road

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there are several reasons why you should not go

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Sometimes the term means both more than a few and different each from the other; in such use, several is often preceded by a possessive adjective
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a review of our denominational theologians .... There have been many of them; they have served their several causes well— Sperry

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her several thoughts . . . as signaled by the changes on her face— Hardy

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chosen every second year by the people of the several States— U. S. Constitution

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Sundry also implies an indefinite number, but it carries regularly a stronger implication of the difference of each from the others than does several; thus, there are several, rather than sundry, eggs left; there are sundry, more explicit than several, aspects of the problem that have not been considered
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she differed ... in sundry important features— Quiller-Couch

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all their sundry emotions of a moment ago were one now in a sense of submissive, unquestioning reverence— Tasaki

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Various (see also DIFFERENT) is often used to mean an indefinite number, with a more or less attenuated impli-cation of difference in identity of each from each
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various persons spoke to me about it

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the various social layers of the American population— Packard

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Divers (compare diverse under DIFFERENT) also has come to imply a vague number, often meaning little more than many or several, but often retaining some of its originally strong implication of difference among the individuals
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he told his story to divers persons

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divers styles of musical expression— Virgil Thomson

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Numerous may qualify plural nouns or singular nouns that designate a collection or assembly of units or individuals. In each case the term implies the existence of a noticeably large number of units or individuals; sometimes, in fact, it connotes a crowding or thronging
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every president has numerous letters from numerous persons

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I have contracted a numerous acquaintance among the best sort of people— Steele

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the commoners who had been summoned . . . formed a numerous assembly— Macaula

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Multifarious adds to the implications of many that of great diversity and often incongruity in the units, individuals, or elements involved
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in many of the multifarious activities he undertook— Ellis

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the multifarious Italian dialects— Heiser

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the large desk on which multifarious files and papers were ranged— Bennett

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the multifarious sufferings of the refugees

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Antonyms: few

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Many — Ma ny, a. & pron. Note: [It has no variation to express degrees of comparison; more and most, which are used for the comparative and superlative degrees, are from a different root.] [OE. mani, moni, AS. manig, m[ae]nig, monig; akin to D. menig,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Many a — Many Ma ny, a. & pron. Note: [It has no variation to express degrees of comparison; more and most, which are used for the comparative and superlative degrees, are from a different root.] [OE. mani, moni, AS. manig, m[ae]nig, monig; akin to D.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • many — [men′ē] adj. more, most [ME < OE manig, akin to Ger manch (OHG manag) < IE base * menegh , many, richly > Sans maghā , gift, OIr menicc, abundant] 1. consisting of some large, indefinite number (of persons or things); numerous 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • many a/an — formal + literary used with a singular noun to refer to a large number of things or people It remained a mystery for many a year. [=for many years] I ve been there many a time. [=many times] Many a tale was told. [=many tales were told] Man …   Useful english dictionary

  • Many — Ma ny, n. [AS. menigeo, menigo, menio, multitude; akin to G. menge, OHG. manag[=i], menig[=i], Goth. managei. See {Many}, a.] 1. The populace; the common people; the majority of people, or of a community. [1913 Webster] After him the rascal many… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Many — may refer to: plural A quantifier that can be used with count nouns often preceded by as or too or so or that ; amounting to a large but indefinite number; many temptations ; a good many ; many directions ; more than a few, more than several… …   Wikipedia

  • Many — Many …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Mány — Administration …   Wikipédia en Français

  • many — 1. Many, like much, tends to sound more formal in positive contexts (They have many friends) than in negative ones (They do not have many friends). In conversation and less formal written English, a lot of (or, even more informally, lots of) is… …   Modern English usage

  • Mány — Mány …   Wikipedia